Ford Confirms First Phase Of Job Losses At Bridgend Plant

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Ford, a car manufacturer, has confirmed that approximately 370 members of its employees will be losing their jobs in a voluntary redundancy programme at the Bridgend engine plant of the company.

There is affirmation of the reports that were published last month that Ford will start removing jobs at the plant as the firm re-evaluates its strategy in its operations in Europe.

Unions said that they were informed last month that approximately 990 people would be made redundant by next year, with Ford no longer needing the same level of production in the United Kingdom.

The company said that the voluntary redundancies would have an impact on the hourly and salaried employees as it attempts to create a “sustainably profitable business” on the continent.

Employees were officially informed regarding the news on Friday. The company said that those who are chosen for redundancy will be leaving later this year.

A spokesperson from Ford stated: “The programme follows discussion with the union on matching the plant’s labour requirements to the projected production volume expectations in the near term.”

He added: “It is anticipated that the majority of employees who apply and are selected for voluntary separation under this programme will leave Ford employment in the third and fourth quarters of 2019.”

The US car giant confirmed its plans for a major reshuffle last January. It said that it would affect the operations of the company across Europe and the United Kingdom.

Bridgend also produces the engines for Jaguar Land Rover, however, that contract is set to expire at the end of the year, as does the deal to make the Ecoboost engine of Ford.

The factory did win the investment of the Dragon, the latest petrol engine of Ford, however, that will only employ 500 of the current 1,700 workers on the site.

Under the current plans of the company, less than 1,000 jobs will be lost at the plant by 2021 in two phases. It is part of the 1,150 job cuts across the United Kingdom.