Paris Protest Reignite In Its Fourth Week

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The city of Paris is in lockdown as the authorities in France brace themselves for the a fourth weekend of riots and violent protests. The demonstrations show no sign of abating despite the desperate attempts of the government to agree to a ceasefire with the protestors.

Various roads have been closed and shops boarded up in the capital as the riot police clashed once again with the gilets jaunes (yellow vest) protesters today.

This weekend, some iconic tourist destinations including the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower are closing their doors in anticipation of the demonstrations.

The under-fire government of Emmanual Macron, the President of Frane, is set to deploy around 90,000 security personnel across the nation today and tomorrow in an effort to stop the renewed violence, which is being called as the “Act IV” on social media.

Earlier this week, the French government decided to stop the planned fuel tax increase which has provoked widespread protests and violent demonstrations across the nation in an attempt to ease anger on the streets.

Over a quarter of a million protesters have participated in the street demonstrations in recent weeks, amid anger over the increasing price of diesel, which has increased by 23 percent over the past year to its highest point in nearly two decades.

The government of President Macron has raised its hydrocarbon tax this year by 7.6 cents per litre on diesel and 3.9 cents on petrol. It has said that more taxes on fossil fuels were necessary to fund the investments on renewable energy.

However, while the demonstration started as a protest against an increase in duties on diesel, the revolt has spiralled into a wider range of issues encompassing anger at the administration of President Macron.

TV footage that was earlier this month showed the inside of the Arc de Triomphe carrying the scars of the violence in Paris in which many people were left injured.

Anti-capitalist demands and statements calling for the resignation of the president were graffitied on the outside of the monument, while some cars and properties were damaged and burned across the capital.

Earlier this December, Macron has accused his political opponents of hijacking the protests in order to stop his reform programme. He held emergency discussions with the police and security officials after inspecting the damage across the capital.