UK Government Planning To Launch New Safety Symbol In Case Of No-Deal Brexit

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The government of the United Kingdom has made preparations to replace CE, safety symbol of the European Union, in the event that a no deal Brexit occurs.

If the United Kingdom leaves the European Union without a deal, it will not be able to use the CE symbol that is imprinted on household items, such as light bulbs, toys, and kettles.

Instead, the BBC revealed that the United Kingdom will replace the version of the symbol of the European Union with a new one, UKCA.

The new logo stands for “UK Conformity Assessed.”

Since 1993, CE has served as the mark that shows the consumers that a product meets standards of the European Union and that the products have been tested. Some of the manufacturers are worried that it will be expensive to change the logo.

The new logo would compel businesses to change their advertising,  packaging, and even an element of the products themselves.

During an interview with the BBC, Scott Steedman of the British Standards Institution, stated: “A UK mark would provide confidence to consumers and to the authorities that these products meet UK regulatory requirements.”

He added: “It provides flexibility for government should there be divergence of regulations to insist that manufacturers were committing to that UK regulatory practice in future.”

The government of the United Kigndom is expected to announce the new plans soon.

For the manufacturers, that will imply a one-off cost.

During an interview with the BBC, the chief executive of the manufacturers’ organisation EEF, Stephen Phipson, stated: “In a very short period of time, thousands of companies are going to have to spend millions of pounds collectively on changing all their markings to comply with the new mark.”

He added: “It’s another cost as a result of not doing a deal on Brexit.”

Goods that are made in the United Kingdom which are exported to the European Union may have to be stamped with two marks – UKCA for Great Britain and Northern Ireland and CE for EU markets.