US Vice President Mike Pence Urges EU To Back Off Iran Nuclear Deal

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Mike Pence, the Vice President, of the United States of America, has urged European countries to back off from the Iran nuclear deal and continue to be “vigilant” over the security threat that was posed by Huawei.

Officials in Europe defied the demands of the United States. It said that the continent stood united in a commitment to the deal, which hinders Iran from working on its nuclear programme in return for relief on sanctions.

Talking at the Munich Security Conference, Pence called for the European Union to follow the lead of the United States in withdrawing from the deal.

He stated: “The time has come for our European partners to stand with us and with the Iranian people.”

He added: “The time has come for our European partners to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.”

Pence also gave a warning regarding the security threat that was posed by Huawei adding to intensifying fears that the Chinese telecoms company was spying for the government of China.

According to reports, Germany and Italy are among the western nations to have sought to exclude Huawei amid its planned 5G rollout.

Pence stated: “The United States has also been very clear with our security partners on the threat posed by Huawei and other Chinese telecom companies.”

He added: “We must protect our critical telecom infrastructure and America is calling on all our security partners to be vigilant.”

Earlier today, Angela Merkel, during a speech in Munich. He called for global cooperation and questioned whether the decision of the United States to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal was considered as the right move.

She stated: “The only question is how we attain our mutual goal…do we do that by terminating our agreement or by using the small amount of leverage we do have (via the nuclear deal)?”

She added: “This is a tactical question.”

Yesterday, Heiko Maas, the foreign minister of German, defied the demands of the United States – and previous remarks by Pence – making it clear that France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the European Union were committed to the deal.